ehehehehe-lokid:

Ruins

beautiful

(Source: prettyhaven, via xabandoned)

"Art and artists are very much misunderstood in our culture… Because we have this ethic of purpose and utility, and art is not useful in a very direct way. And I think that, also, our concept of artists is that they’re lazy somehow and that they don’t want to work hard… In fact, what I discovered in working with artists is that most artists, by and large, are not doing it because they want to be the next Andy Warhol — they’re doing it at huge personal expense and struggling to keep a practice going while trying to figure out how to make ends meet. They’re not making art because they want to make money, they make art because they have something to say that they want to share with the world."

20x200 founder Jen Bekman, one of the Internet’s pioneering creative entrepreneurs, on Design Matters – the entire interview is very much worth a listen. (via explore-blog)

(Source: explore-blog, via danhoward)

Tags: art truth quote

(Source: sirinthada)

sakimichan:

._.

Oh my goodness, that’s beautiful!

sakimichan:

._.

Oh my goodness, that’s beautiful!

Tags: art wow

kateordie:

This week’s update for Comics Bulletin is in celebration of my first year in comics. There will be an article attached after the weekend delving in my experiences, thrills and chills starting out, but for now - ART!
I’m incredibly lucky for what I’ve gotten to do in the last twelve months, and I thank each and every one of you for being a part of it. It’s humbling. Always humbling. It stuns me how little time as passed and how many people have tuned in. Here’s to 2012!

I love this! A lot of times, the artists I know spend time waffling, unsure if they should submit, should publish, should do this thing over here. Is it worth it? What if you fail? What if no one looks? What if people do look? What if it’s not good enough?
In the end, you’ll never know unless you try. Maybe you’ll fail, but it’s better to fail than to never try at all. 

kateordie:

This week’s update for Comics Bulletin is in celebration of my first year in comics. There will be an article attached after the weekend delving in my experiences, thrills and chills starting out, but for now - ART!

I’m incredibly lucky for what I’ve gotten to do in the last twelve months, and I thank each and every one of you for being a part of it. It’s humbling. Always humbling. It stuns me how little time as passed and how many people have tuned in. Here’s to 2012!

I love this! A lot of times, the artists I know spend time waffling, unsure if they should submit, should publish, should do this thing over here. Is it worth it? What if you fail? What if no one looks? What if people do look? What if it’s not good enough?

In the end, you’ll never know unless you try. Maybe you’ll fail, but it’s better to fail than to never try at all. 

mothernaturenetwork:

Sayaka Ganz says she was inspired by Japanese Shinto beliefs that all objects have spirits and those that are thrown out “weep at night inside the trash bin.” With this vivid image in her mind, she began collecting discarded materials — kitchen utensils, sunglasses, appliances, toys, etc. — and upcycling them into works of art. When creating her unique sculptures, Ganz sorts her objects into color groups, constructs a wire frame, and then meticulously attaches every object to the frame until she creates the shape she’s envisioned, which is typically an animal. This one is called “Emergence.”14 artists with a green message


Wow! That’s beautiful. Also, I didn’t know that was a Shinto belief. I actually feel objects have spirit to them too. It’s part of why it’s so hard to throw them out.

mothernaturenetwork:

Sayaka Ganz says she was inspired by Japanese Shinto beliefs that all objects have spirits and those that are thrown out “weep at night inside the trash bin.” With this vivid image in her mind, she began collecting discarded materials — kitchen utensils, sunglasses, appliances, toys, etc. — and upcycling them into works of art. When creating her unique sculptures, Ganz sorts her objects into color groups, constructs a wire frame, and then meticulously attaches every object to the frame until she creates the shape she’s envisioned, which is typically an animal. This one is called “Emergence.”
14 artists with a green message

Wow! That’s beautiful. Also, I didn’t know that was a Shinto belief. I actually feel objects have spirit to them too. It’s part of why it’s so hard to throw them out.

(via kimboosan)

For all my writer and artists friends. Very basic advice that is all so true.

(Source: twitter.com)

A link from my friend, Beth. I haven’t looked through all the pictures yet, but I started with The Garden of the Gods. Beautiful pictures spread out over seasons.

(Source: scotthocking.com)

Downloading of her pictures have been forbidden, so I won’t show them off. They are very much worth a look.

The photographer explored Fort Ord in the years after closure, taking plenty of pictures of empty rooms and standing chairs. It sounds strange, but her pictures are haunting and beautiful. She manages to make even empty rooms come to life with lighting and color.