Downloading of her pictures have been forbidden, so I won’t show them off. They are very much worth a look.

The photographer explored Fort Ord in the years after closure, taking plenty of pictures of empty rooms and standing chairs. It sounds strange, but her pictures are haunting and beautiful. She manages to make even empty rooms come to life with lighting and color.

What used to be a shoppette in Fort Ord. This actually closed in the late 80’s, I believe, when what is now the Ord Market opened on Imjin.

In Ruin, I have to admit that the idea of shopkeepers and innkeepers really comes from the memory of visiting this shoppette with my dad when I was little. He always knew whoever was working behind the counter.

My goal for the end of this year: Find the damn abandoned swimming pool in Fort Ord. Never found it before.

I know where it is now. Had no idea it was even in existence before. If you want  help, message me.

(Source: kcuf-ylgu)

Fort Ord Pool, then and now.

First photo by Steve Anderson, taken in 2007. All others by me, taken 2011.


Off of fourth street in Fort Ord. I pulled in to take pictures of the children’s development center, and I caught sight of these old abandoned houses through the trees. Eerie. They are generally hard to notice and therefore easy to forget. The city does a good job hiding most views of the abandoned with chainlinked fences that have a green covering to hide these buildings from view.
But they can’t hide every view.

Off of fourth street in Fort Ord. I pulled in to take pictures of the children’s development center, and I caught sight of these old abandoned houses through the trees. Eerie. They are generally hard to notice and therefore easy to forget. The city does a good job hiding most views of the abandoned with chainlinked fences that have a green covering to hide these buildings from view.

But they can’t hide every view.

The art of soldiers. I have spent the entire night sitting here looking through the pictures on the site and on their blog. What a beautiful project!
The murals on the “new” barracks are a fascinating look into the lives and minds of the soldiers. You do what you have to in order to adapt. The defacing is also interesting (and probably done by young kids who have no real ties to the military or the military life).
I chose to post this mural in particular of all the pictures from the site I could have picked because the cavalry is close to my heart for many reasons. Many of the buildings associated with the old cavalry, which was out here in the 40’s and ended right after WWII, were bulldozed this past year. Even this mural is gone.

The art of soldiers. I have spent the entire night sitting here looking through the pictures on the site and on their blog. What a beautiful project!

The murals on the “new” barracks are a fascinating look into the lives and minds of the soldiers. You do what you have to in order to adapt. The defacing is also interesting (and probably done by young kids who have no real ties to the military or the military life).

I chose to post this mural in particular of all the pictures from the site I could have picked because the cavalry is close to my heart for many reasons. Many of the buildings associated with the old cavalry, which was out here in the 40’s and ended right after WWII, were bulldozed this past year. Even this mural is gone.